Pain medication did not touch my pain

The pain medication Kim used for her endometriosis hardly touched the pain and she was put on hormone drug treatment.  She also has severe bowel symptoms and really bad constipation every day




This is Kim’s story ….


I have been diagnosed with endometriosis for 3 years now. When I first started my period around age 15 I immediately had the painful cramping. I would miss 2 or more days of school each month and I would lay in my bed rocking back and forth in the foetal position. Tylenol did not even come close to touching the pain.

 

My mom finally took me to the gynaecologist. He put me on birth control. It helped a little in the beginning, but so many people told me that the cramps were just a normal effect of my period.


So not knowing any better I stayed quiet for many years.

 

After the birth of my oldest daughter I started to have bad cramping in my back all through the month. I went to the doctor and found out that I had scoliosis and so he told me I would have chronic back problems for the rest of my life. I took that at face value and again just tried my best to ignore it. 2 years later my husband and I decided it was time to try for another baby.

 

We had severe marriage problems, mostly due to my horrible mood swings. I had severe bouts of depression, sometimes resulting to thoughts of suicide. I was finally put on the ortho evra hormone patch, and I have to say that was the best thing to happen to me in a long time.

 

The cramping went away along with the mood swings. My weight was finally stable. Since I had become pregnant without trying with my first, I thought it would be no problem to become pregnant a second time. I was wrong.

 

It took us a year, along with a lot of praying to get pregnant again. I almost suffered a miss-carriage due to the fact that my cervix started to bleed. I was blessed to have my daughter without any more complications, but afterwards the pain and mood swings came in full force. I put on 14 pounds during my pregnancy, but put on 45 after my pregnancy.

 

I have had problems with my bowels that mock IBS. I have severe GIRDS. I recently had pre-stage cervical cancer (this unbelievably on a cervix that is nearly calcified from the endometriosis.) My pain is getting worse and I have had trouble holding urine in my bladder.

 

I went to the ER for cramping and found out after several tests that I was suffering from Colon Spasms that nearly knocked me out because of it. I was suffering from extreme constipation and now have to be on Polyethylene Glycol daily to prevent constipation and severe cramping. No one in my husband’s family nor he understands what I am going through.

 

My sister also has Endometriosis. Hers was so severe that she had a total hysterectomy, but that only dulled the problems.

 

She still has symptoms, acne problems, weight gain, gastrointestinal problems and depression. I am a full-time mother, I work 25+ hours a week, and I am nearly a full-time college student.

 

So many people have never even heard of the illness. My professors are unsympathetic and have threatened to kick me out of class. Intercourse is painful and even if it is not, then I cramp and swell so badly afterwards that I look as though I am 4 months pregnant.

 

I have an endless supply of sweat pants that I wear every time I cramp, and I have more acne at age 31 then I did at 16.

 

I go through bouts of depression. I am scared to try a new doctor because everyone’s answer seems to be hysterectomy and I refuse to go there.

 

Some days I am too tired to even get up. I may not have pain that day, but it seems too difficult to even raise myself up to go to the bathroom. How do you explain an illness that has no definite pattern. How do you make your professors believe you and not think you are making it all up just to get out of class? 

 

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